Strangely Consistent

Musings about programming, Perl 6, and programming Perl 6

Has it been three years?

007, the toy language, is turning three today. Whoa.

On its one-year anniversary, I wrote a blog post to chronicle it. It seriously doesn't feel like two years since I wrote that post.

On and off, in between long stretches of just being a parent, I come back to 007 and work intensely on it. I can't remember ever keeping a side project alive for three years before. (Later note: Referring to the language here, not my son.) So there is that.

So in a weird way, even though the language is not as far along as I would expect it to be after three years, I'm also positively surprised that it still exists and is active after three years!

In the previous blog post, I proudly announce that "We're gearing up to an (internal) v1.0.0 release". Well, we're still gearing up for v1.0.0, and we are closer to it. The details are in the roadmap, which has become much more detailed since then.

Noteworthy things that happened in these past two years:

Things that I'm looking forward to right now:

I tried to write those in increasing order of difficulty.

All in all, I'm quite eager to one day burst into #perl6 or #perl6-dev and actually showcase examples where macros quite clearly do useful, non-trivial things. 007 is and has always been about producing such examples, and making them run in a real (if toy) environment.

And while we're not quite over that hump yet, we're perceptibly closer than we were two years ago.

Belated addendum: Thanks and hugs to sergot++, to vendethiel++, to raiph++ and eritain++, for sharing the journey with me so far.

The root of all eval

Ah, the eval function. Loved, hated. Mostly the latter.

$ perl -E'my $program = q[say "OH HAI"]; eval $program'
OH HAI

I was a bit stunned when the eval function was renamed to EVAL in Perl 6 (back in 2013, after spec discussion here). I've never felt really comfortable with the rationale for doing so. I seem to be more or less alone in this opinion, though, which is fine.

The rationale was "the function does something really weird, so we should flag it with upper case". Like we do with BEGIN and the other phasers, for example. With BEGIN and others, the upper-casing is motivated, I agree. A phaser takes you "outside of the normal control flow". The eval function doesn't.

Other things that we upper-case are things like .WHAT, which look like attributes but are really specially code-generated at compile-time into something completely different. So even there the upper-casing is motivated because something outside of the normal is happening.

eval in the end is just another function. Yes, it's a function with potentially quite wide-ranging side effects, that's true. But a lot of fairly standard functions have wide-ranging side effects. (To name a few: shell, die, exit.) You don't see anyone clamoring to upper-case those.

I guess it could be argued that eval is very special because it hooks into the compiler and runtime in ways that normal functions don't, and maybe can't. (This is also how TimToady explained it in the commit message of the renaming commit.) But that's an argument from implementation details, which doesn't feel satisfactory. It applies with equal force to the lower-cased functions just mentioned.

To add insult to injury, the renamed EVAL is also made deliberately harder to use:

$ perl6 -e'my $program = q[say "OH HAI"]; EVAL $program'
===SORRY!=== Error while compiling -e
EVAL is a very dangerous function!!! (use the MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL pragma to override this error,
but only if you're VERY sure your data contains no injection attacks)
at -e:1
------> program = q[say "OH HAI"]; EVAL $program⏏<EOL>

$ perl6 -e'use MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL; my $program = q[say "OH HAI"]; EVAL $program'
OH HAI

Firstly, injection attacks are a real issue, and no laughing matter. We should educate each other and newcomers about them.

Secondly, that error message ("EVAL is a very dangerous function!!!") is completely over-the-top in a way that damages rather than helps. I believe when we explain the dangers of code injection to people, we need to do it calmly and matter-of-factly. Not with three exclamation marks. The error message makes sense to someone who already knows about injection attacks; it provides no hints or clues for people who are unaware of the risks.

(The Perl 6 community is not unique in eval-hysteria. Yesterday I stumbled across a StackOverflow thread about how to turn a string with a type name into the corresponding constructor in JavaScript. Some unlucky soul suggested eval, and everybody else immediately piled on to point out how irresponsible that was. Solely as a knee-jerk reaction "because eval is bad".)

Thirdly, MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL. Please, can we just... not. 😓 Random reference to monkies and the weird attempt at levity while switching on a nuclear-chainsaw function aside, I find it odd that a function that enables EVAL is called something with NO-EVAL. That's not Least Surprise.

Anyway, the other day I realized how I can get around both the problem of the all-caps name and the problem of the necessary pragma:

$ perl6 -e'my &eval = &EVAL; my $program = q[say "OH HAI"]; eval $program'
OH HAI

I was so happy to realize this that I thought I'd blog about it. Apparently the very dangerous function (!!!) is fine again if we just give it back its old name. 😜

Deep Git

I am not good at chess.

I mean... "I know how the pieces move". (That's the usual phrase, isn't it?) I've even tried to understand chess better at various points in my youth, trying to improve my swing. I could probably beat some of you other self-identified "I know how the pieces move" folks out there. With a bit of luck. As long as you don't, like, cheat by having a strategy or something.

I guess what I'm getting at here is that I am not, secretly, an international chess master. OK, now that's off my chest. Phew!

Imagining what it's like to be really good at chess is very interesting, though. I can say with some confidence that a chess master never stops and asks herself "wait — how does the knight piece move, again?" Not even I do that! Obviously, the knight piece is the one that moves √5 distances on the board. 哈哈

I can even get a sense of what terms a master-level player uses internally, by reading what master players wrote. They focus on tactics and strategy. Attacks and defenses. Material and piece values. Sacrifices and piece exchange. Space and control. Exploiting weaknesses. Initiative. Openings and endgames.

Such high-level concerns leave the basic mechanics of piece movements far behind. Sure, those movements are in there somewhere. They are not irrelevant, of course. They're just taken for granted and no longer interesting in themselves. Meanwhile, the list of master-player concerns above could almost equally well apply to a professional Go player. (s:g/piece/stone/ for Go.)

Master-level players have stopped looking at individual trees, and are now focusing on the forest.

The company that employs me (Edument) has a new slogan. We've put it on the backs of sweaters which we then wear to events and conferences:

We teach what you can't google.

I really like this new slogan. Particularly, it feels like something we as a teaching company have already trended towards for a while. Some things are easy to find just by googling them, or finding a good cheat sheet. But that's not why you attend a course. We should position ourselves so as to teach answers to the deep, tricky things that only emerge after using something for a while.

You're starting to see how this post comes together now, aren't you? 😄

2017 will be my ninth year with Git. I know it quite well by now, having learned it in depth and breadth along the way. I can safely say that I'm better at Git than I am at chess at this point.

Um. I'm most certainly not an international Git grandmaster — but largely that's because such a title does not exist. (If someone reads this post and goes on to start an international Git tournament, I will be very happy. I might sign up.)

No, my point is that the basic commands have taken on the role for me that I think basic piece movements have taken on for chess grandmasters. They don't really matter much; they're a means to an end, and it's the end that I'm focusing on when I type them.

(Yes, I still type them. There are some pretty decent GUIs out there, but none of them give me the control of the command line. Sorry-not-sorry.)

Under this analogy, what are the things I value with Git, if not the commands? What are the higher-level abstractions that I tend to think in terms of nowadays?

(Yes, these are the ACID guarantees for database transactions, but made to work for Git instead.)

A colleague of mine talks a lot about "definition of done". It seems to be a Scrum thing. It's his favorite term more than mine, but I still like it for its attempt at "mechanizing" quality, which I believe can succeed in a large number of situations.

Another colleague of mine likes the Boy Scout Rule of "Always leave the campground cleaner than you found it". If you think of this in terms of code, it means something like refactoring a code base as you go, cleaning it up bit by bit and asymptotically approaching code perfection. But if you think of it in terms of process, it dovetails quite nicely with the "definition of done" above.

Instead of explaining how in the abstract, let's go through a concrete-enough example:

  1. Some regression is discovered. (Usually by some developer dogfooding the system.)
  2. If it's not immediately clear, we bisect and find the offending commit.
  3. ASAP, we revert that commit.
  4. We analyze the problematic part of the reverted commit until we understand it thoroughly. Typically, the root cause will be something that was not in our definition of done, but should've been.
  5. We write up a new commit/branch with the original (good) functionality restored, but without the discovered problem.
  6. (Possibly much later.) We attempt to add discovery of the problem to our growing set of static checks. The way we remember to do that is through a TODO list in a wiki. This list keeps growing and shrinking in fits and starts.

Note in particular the interplay between process, quality and, yes, Git. Someone could've told me at the end of step 6 that I had totalled 29 or so Git basic commands along the way, and I would've believed them. But that's not what matters to us as a team. If we could do with magic pixie dust what we do with Git — keep historic snapshots of the code while ensuring quality and isolation — we might be satisfied magic pixie dust users instead.

Somewhere along the way, I also got a much more laid-back approach to conflicts. (And I stopped saying "merge conflicts", because there are also conflicts during rebase, revert, cherry-pick, and stash — and they are basically the same deal.) A conflict happens when a patch P needs to be applied in an environment which differs too much from the one in which P was created.

Aside: in response to this post, jast++ wrote this on #perl6: "one minor nitpick: git knows two different meanings for 'merge'. one is commit-level merge, one is file-level three-way merge. the latter is used in rebase, cherry-pick etc., too, so technically those conflicts can still be called merge conflicts. :)" — TIL.

But we actually don't care so much about conflicts. Git cares about conflicts, becuase it can't just apply the patch automatically. What we care about is that the intent of the patch has survived. No software can check that for us. Since the (conflict ↔ no conflict) axis is independent from the (intent broken ↔ intent preserved) axis, we get four cases in total. Two of those are straightforward, because the (lack of) conflict corresponds to the (lack of) broken intent.

The remaining two cases happen rarely but are still worth thinking about:

If we care about quality, one lesson emerges from mst's example: always run the tests after you merge and after you've resolved conflicts. And another lesson from my example: try to introduce automatic checks for structures and relations in the code base that you care about. In this case, branch A could've put in a test or a linting step that failed as soon as it saw something according to the old naming convention.

A lot of the focus on quality also has to do with doggedly going to the bottom of things. It's in the nature of failures and exceptional circumstances to clump together and happen at the same time. So you need to handle them one at a time, carefully unraveling one effect at a time, slowly disassembling the hex like a child's rod puzzle. Git sure helps with structuring and linearizing the mess that happens in everyday development, exploration, and debugging.

As I write this, I realize even more how even when I try to describe how Git has faded into the background as something important-but-uninteresting for me, I can barely keep the other concepts out of focus. Quality being chief among them. In my opinion, the focus on improving not just the code but the process, of leaving the campground cleaner than we found it, those are the things that make it meaningful for me to work as a developer even decades later. The feeling that code is a kind of poetry that punches you back — but as it does so, we learn something valuable for next time.

I still hear people say "We don't have time to write tests!" Well, in our teams, we don't have time not to write tests! Ditto with code review, linting, and writing descriptive commit messages.

No-one but Piet Hein deserves the last word of this post:

The road to wisdom? — Well, it's plain
and simple to express:

Err
and err
and err again
but less
and less
and less.